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A world history of architecture / Michael Fazio, Marian Moffett, Lawrence Wodehouse.

By: Fazio, Michael W.
Contributor(s): Fazio, Michael W. Buildings across time | Moffett, Marian | Wodehouse, Lawrence.
Edition: Third edition.Description: xvi, 608 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 29 cm.ISBN: 9781780671116.Subject(s): Architecture -- HistoryDDC classification: 720.9
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 The Beginnings Of Architecture -- Prehistoric Settlements and Megalith Constructions -- Eastern Europe -- Western Europe -- Ancient Mesopotamia -- Sumerians, Akkadians, and Neo-Sumerians -- Essay: The Sumerian View of the World -- Babylonians, Hittites, and Assyrians -- The Persians -- Ancient Egypt -- The Early Dynastic Period and Old Kingdom -- Essay: "Hydraulic" Civilizations -- The First Pyramids -- Fourth-Dynasty Pyramids at Giza -- The Middle Kingdom -- The New Kingdom -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 2 The Greek World -- The Aegean Cultures -- The Minoans -- The Mycenaeans -- Greece: The Archaic Period -- Greece: The Classical Period -- The Parthenon, Athens -- Essay: Celebrating Athena's Birthday -- Other Buildings on the Acropolis -- Greece: The Hellenistic Period -- Greek City Planning -- The Athenian Agora -- Hellenistic Cities -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 3 The Architecture Of Ancient India And Southeast Asia -- Religions of India -- Early Buddhist Shrines -- Essay: Bamiyan and the Colossal Buddha -- Hindu Temples -- Early Buildings -- Later Temples -- Angkor Wat -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 4 The Traditional Architecture Of China And Japan -- Chinese Architectural Principles -- Principles of City Planning -- Houses and Gardens -- Essay: Elder Brother Rock -- Japanese Temple Architecture -- Buddhist Temples -- Shinto Shrines -- Japanese Houses and Castles -- Zen Buddhist Architecture and Its Derivatives -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 5 The Roman World -- Etruscan Imprints -- The Romans -- Building Techniques and Materials -- City Planning -- Essay: The Engineering Might of the Romans -- Temples -- Public Buildings -- Basilicas -- Public Baths -- Theaters and Amphitheaters -- Residences -- Urban Housing -- Rural Villas and Urban Palaces -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 6 Early Christian And Byzantine Architecture -- Early Christian Basilicas -- Martyria, Baptisteries, and Mausolea -- Essay: Eusebius and Constantine -- Byzantine Basilicas and Domed Basilicas -- Centrally Planned Byzantine Churches -- Churches in Russia -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 7 Islamic Architecture -- Early Shrines -- Conception of the Mosque -- Regional Variations in Mosque Design -- Columned Hall or Hypostyle Mosques -- Iwan Mosques -- Multi-Domed Mosques -- Tombs -- Houses and Urban Patterns -- The Palace and the Garden -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 8 Early Medieval And Romanesque Architecture -- Carolingian Architecture -- The Revival of Masonry Construction -- Monasteries -- Viking Architecture -- Early Romanesque Architecture -- Romanesque Architecture of the Holy Roman Empire -- Pilgrimage Road Churches -- The Order of Cluny -- Essay: The Mystic Mill from Vezelay -- Aquitaine and Provence -- Cistercian Monasteries -- Norman Architecture -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 9 Gothic Architecture -- Early Gothic -- The Abbey Church of St. Denis -- Early Gothic Cathedrals -- High Gothic -- Chartres and Bourges -- The Sainte-Chapelle -- English Gothic -- Early English -- Essay: A Wool Church -- Decorated and Perpendicular -- German, Czech, and Italian Gothic -- Hall Churches -- Italian Gothic Variations -- Medieval Construction -- Medieval Houses and Castles -- Housing -- Castles -- Medieval Cities -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 10 Indigenous Architecture In The Americas And Africa -- North America -- Tribes of the Great Plains and the Great Lakes -- Tribes of the Northeast -- Tribes of the Mississippi River Basin -- Essay: The Birthplace of the Choctaws -- Arctic and Subarctic Tribes -- Tribes of the Northwest and Northern California -- Tribes of the Southwest -- Mexico and Central America -- The Olmecs of the Eastern Mexican Coast -- Teotihuacan in the Valley of Mexico -- The Zapotecs and Mixtecs at Monte Alban, Oaxaca -- The Maya -- Tikal -- Copan and Palenque -- Uxmal and Chichen-Itza -- The Toltecs in the Valley of Mexico -- The Aztecs at Tenochtitlan -- South America: The Andean World -- Early cities on the North Coast of Peru -- Early Development in the Northern Peruvian Andes -- The Nazca on the Peruvian South Coast -- An Empire in the Western Bolivian Highlands -- The Chimor Kingdom -- The Inca -- Africa -- Portable Fabric Structures -- Permanent Dwellings -- Urbanization and Fortification -- Palaces -- Churches and Mosques -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 11 Renaissance Architecture -- Filippo Brunelleschi -- Florence Cathedral -- Other Florentine Buildings -- Michelozzo Bartolomeo and the Palazzo Medici -- Leon Battista Alberti -- Writings -- The Palazzo Rucellai, Florence -- Churches in Rimini, Florence, and Mantua -- The Ideal City -- Essay: Pius's Resolutions -- The Spread of the Renaissance -- Urbino -- Milan -- Leonardo da Vinci -- Donato Bramante -- The Tempietto, Rome -- St. Peter's, Rome -- The Belvedere Court and the House of Raphael, Rome -- The Late Renaissance and Mannerism -- The Villa Madama, Rome -- The Uffizi, Florence -- The Palazzo del Te, Mantua -- Michelangelo -- S. Lorenzo, Florence -- The Campidoglio, Rome -- The Palazzo Farnese, Rome -- St. Peter's, Rome -- Porta Pia, Rome -- Sforza Chapel, Rome -- Andrea Palladio -- Buildings in Vicenza -- Villa Designs in the Veneto -- Churches in Venice -- The Teatro Olimpico -- Palladio's Venice -- Garden Design -- The Renaissance in France -- Chateaux in the Loire Valley -- Sebastiano Serlio and Philibert de l'Orme -- The Louvre and the Place Royale -- The Renaissance in England -- Elizabethan Country Houses -- Inigo Jones -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 12 Baroque Architecture -- The Reformation and Counter-Reformation -- Il Gesu, Rome -- Pope Sixtus V and the Replanning of Rome -- St. Peter's -- Gianlorenzo Bernini -- The Completion of St. Peter's -- S. Andrea al Quirinale, Rome -- Francesco Borromini -- S. Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome -- S. Ivo della Sapienza -- Urban Open Spaces in Baroque Rome -- The Piazza Navona -- The Piazza del Popolo and the Spanish Steps -- Essay: Piazza Navona -- A Space for Spectacle -- The Spread of Baroque Architecture to Northern Italy -- Guarino Guarini -- The Baroque in Central Europe -- Die Wies, Bavaria -- The Baroque in France -- The Louvre, Paris -- Francois Mansart -- The Chateau of Versailles -- Jules-Hardouin Mansart -- Christopher Wren and the Baroque in England -- The City Churches -- St. Paul's -- Housing in the Manner of Wren -- Nicholas Hawksmoor, Sir John Vanbrugh, and James Gibbs -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 13 Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, And The Rococo -- The Rococo -- The English Neo-Palladians -- Essay: The Enlightenment and the Abbe Laugier's Primitive Hut -- The Return to Antiquity -- The Style Created by Robert Adam -- William Chambers, an English Neo-Classicist Trained in France -- Architectural Education and Architectural Theory in France -- The Inventive Neo-Classicism of Etienne-Louis Boullee and Claude-Nicolas Ledoux -- Other Neo-Classical Architects in France -- The Distinctive Style of Sir John Soane in England -- The German Neo-Classicism of Karl Friedrich Schinkel -- Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, and Neo-Classicism in the United States -- Essay: Piranesi's View of Rome -- Romanticism and the Picturesque -- The Romantic Landscape -- Picturesque Buildings -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 14 Eclecticism, Industrialization, And Newness -- The Challenge of the Industrial Revolution -- Developments in Steel -- Iron and Glass Greenhouse Designs -- Joseph Paxton and the Crystal Palace -- Essay: The Coming of the Railroad -- Eugene-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc and Rational Design -- Henri Labrouste and His Library Designs -- Gustave Eiffel and His Tower -- Skeletal Construction in Concrete and Wood -- A.W.N.
Note continued: Samuel Mockbee and the Rural Studio -- A Regional Modernism in Japan -- Kenzo Tange -- Fumihiko Maki -- Arata Isozaki -- Tadao Ando -- Counterproposals to Modernism -- Robert Venturi -- Philip Johnson -- Charles Moore -- Michael Graves -- Modem Classicism and Ongoing Traditionalism -- Aldo Rossi -- Quinlan Terry -- Allan Greenberg -- Robert A.M. Stern -- Leon Krier -- Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk -- Deconstruction -- Modem Form-Makers -- Louis I. Kahn -- Jørn Utzon -- Ove Arup -- The Boston City Hall -- Justus Dahinden -- Frank Gehry -- Richard Meier -- Antoine Predock -- Rafael Moneo -- Rem Koolhaas and the Office for Metropolitan Architecture -- Zaha Hadid -- Maya Lin and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial -- Modern Materials and Technologies -- Eero Saarinen and His Office -- Carlo Scarpa -- James Stirling -- Norman Foster -- Renzo Piano -- Eric Owen Moss -- Tod Williams and Billie Tsien -- Mack Scogin and Merrill Elam -- Daniel Libeskind -- Steven Holl -- Jean Nouvel -- Santiago Calatrava -- Herzog and de Meuron -- Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio -- Sustainable Design -- R. Buckminster Fuller -- Glenn Murcutt -- Thom Mayne and Morphosis -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas
Pugin, the Gothic Revival, and Opposition to Industrialization -- John Ruskin and the Arts and Crafts Movement -- William Morris -- Richard Norman Shaw, C.F.A. Voysey, and Herman Muthesius -- The Art Nouveau -- Victor Horta and Hector Guimard -- Antonio Gaudi -- Charles Rennie Mackintosh -- The Viennese Secession -- The Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Richard Morris Hunt, and Frank Furness -- Henry Hobson Richardson and the Search for an American Style -- McKim, Mead, and White -- The First Skyscrapers -- Louis Sullivan and the Tall Building "Artistically Considered" -- The World's Columbian Exposition -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 15 The Twentieth Century And Modernism -- The Idea of a Modern Architecture -- The War of Words -- Adolf Loos -- Influence of Loos's Lectures and Publications -- The Raumplan and Loos's Buildings -- Frank Lloyd Wright -- Developing the Prairie House -- Wright's Early Public Buildings -- The Flight from America -- H.P. Berlage and Wendingen -- German Expressionism -- The Deutscher Werkbund and Peter Behrens -- Exploiting the Potential of Concrete -- Le Corbusier -- The Dom-ino and Citrohan Houses -- The Villa Stein and the Villa Savoye -- Le Corbusier's "Five Points" -- Essay: Futurism and Constructivism -- Walter Gropius -- The Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau -- De Stijl -- Ludwig Mies van der Rohe -- The Barcelona Pavilion and the Tugendhat House -- Mies, the Weissenhof Siedlung, and the International Style -- The Continuation of Traditional Design -- Art Deco or Style Moderne -- The Ongoing Modernist Program -- Later Work of Frank Lloyd Wright -- Broadacre City -- Fallingwater -- The Guggenheim Museum and Taliesin West -- Wrightian Connections -- Later Work of Le Corbusier -- Ronchamp and Ste. Marie-de-la-Tourette -- Chandigarh -- Diaspora and the Later Work of Mies Van der Rohe -- Planning and Building at IIT -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 16 Modernisms In The Mid- And Late Twentieth Century And Beyond -- Modern Regionalism -- Alvar Aalto -- Luis Barragan -- Alvaro Siza
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General Circulation 720.9 FAZ 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 27763

United States edition published under title: Buildings across time : an introduction to world architecture.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 586-591) and index.

Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 The Beginnings Of Architecture -- Prehistoric Settlements and Megalith Constructions -- Eastern Europe -- Western Europe -- Ancient Mesopotamia -- Sumerians, Akkadians, and Neo-Sumerians -- Essay: The Sumerian View of the World -- Babylonians, Hittites, and Assyrians -- The Persians -- Ancient Egypt -- The Early Dynastic Period and Old Kingdom -- Essay: "Hydraulic" Civilizations -- The First Pyramids -- Fourth-Dynasty Pyramids at Giza -- The Middle Kingdom -- The New Kingdom -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 2 The Greek World -- The Aegean Cultures -- The Minoans -- The Mycenaeans -- Greece: The Archaic Period -- Greece: The Classical Period -- The Parthenon, Athens -- Essay: Celebrating Athena's Birthday -- Other Buildings on the Acropolis -- Greece: The Hellenistic Period -- Greek City Planning -- The Athenian Agora -- Hellenistic Cities -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 3 The Architecture Of Ancient India And Southeast Asia -- Religions of India -- Early Buddhist Shrines -- Essay: Bamiyan and the Colossal Buddha -- Hindu Temples -- Early Buildings -- Later Temples -- Angkor Wat -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 4 The Traditional Architecture Of China And Japan -- Chinese Architectural Principles -- Principles of City Planning -- Houses and Gardens -- Essay: Elder Brother Rock -- Japanese Temple Architecture -- Buddhist Temples -- Shinto Shrines -- Japanese Houses and Castles -- Zen Buddhist Architecture and Its Derivatives -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 5 The Roman World -- Etruscan Imprints -- The Romans -- Building Techniques and Materials -- City Planning -- Essay: The Engineering Might of the Romans -- Temples -- Public Buildings -- Basilicas -- Public Baths -- Theaters and Amphitheaters -- Residences -- Urban Housing -- Rural Villas and Urban Palaces -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 6 Early Christian And Byzantine Architecture -- Early Christian Basilicas -- Martyria, Baptisteries, and Mausolea -- Essay: Eusebius and Constantine -- Byzantine Basilicas and Domed Basilicas -- Centrally Planned Byzantine Churches -- Churches in Russia -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 7 Islamic Architecture -- Early Shrines -- Conception of the Mosque -- Regional Variations in Mosque Design -- Columned Hall or Hypostyle Mosques -- Iwan Mosques -- Multi-Domed Mosques -- Tombs -- Houses and Urban Patterns -- The Palace and the Garden -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 8 Early Medieval And Romanesque Architecture -- Carolingian Architecture -- The Revival of Masonry Construction -- Monasteries -- Viking Architecture -- Early Romanesque Architecture -- Romanesque Architecture of the Holy Roman Empire -- Pilgrimage Road Churches -- The Order of Cluny -- Essay: The Mystic Mill from Vezelay -- Aquitaine and Provence -- Cistercian Monasteries -- Norman Architecture -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 9 Gothic Architecture -- Early Gothic -- The Abbey Church of St. Denis -- Early Gothic Cathedrals -- High Gothic -- Chartres and Bourges -- The Sainte-Chapelle -- English Gothic -- Early English -- Essay: A Wool Church -- Decorated and Perpendicular -- German, Czech, and Italian Gothic -- Hall Churches -- Italian Gothic Variations -- Medieval Construction -- Medieval Houses and Castles -- Housing -- Castles -- Medieval Cities -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 10 Indigenous Architecture In The Americas And Africa -- North America -- Tribes of the Great Plains and the Great Lakes -- Tribes of the Northeast -- Tribes of the Mississippi River Basin -- Essay: The Birthplace of the Choctaws -- Arctic and Subarctic Tribes -- Tribes of the Northwest and Northern California -- Tribes of the Southwest -- Mexico and Central America -- The Olmecs of the Eastern Mexican Coast -- Teotihuacan in the Valley of Mexico -- The Zapotecs and Mixtecs at Monte Alban, Oaxaca -- The Maya -- Tikal -- Copan and Palenque -- Uxmal and Chichen-Itza -- The Toltecs in the Valley of Mexico -- The Aztecs at Tenochtitlan -- South America: The Andean World -- Early cities on the North Coast of Peru -- Early Development in the Northern Peruvian Andes -- The Nazca on the Peruvian South Coast -- An Empire in the Western Bolivian Highlands -- The Chimor Kingdom -- The Inca -- Africa -- Portable Fabric Structures -- Permanent Dwellings -- Urbanization and Fortification -- Palaces -- Churches and Mosques -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 11 Renaissance Architecture -- Filippo Brunelleschi -- Florence Cathedral -- Other Florentine Buildings -- Michelozzo Bartolomeo and the Palazzo Medici -- Leon Battista Alberti -- Writings -- The Palazzo Rucellai, Florence -- Churches in Rimini, Florence, and Mantua -- The Ideal City -- Essay: Pius's Resolutions -- The Spread of the Renaissance -- Urbino -- Milan -- Leonardo da Vinci -- Donato Bramante -- The Tempietto, Rome -- St. Peter's, Rome -- The Belvedere Court and the House of Raphael, Rome -- The Late Renaissance and Mannerism -- The Villa Madama, Rome -- The Uffizi, Florence -- The Palazzo del Te, Mantua -- Michelangelo -- S. Lorenzo, Florence -- The Campidoglio, Rome -- The Palazzo Farnese, Rome -- St. Peter's, Rome -- Porta Pia, Rome -- Sforza Chapel, Rome -- Andrea Palladio -- Buildings in Vicenza -- Villa Designs in the Veneto -- Churches in Venice -- The Teatro Olimpico -- Palladio's Venice -- Garden Design -- The Renaissance in France -- Chateaux in the Loire Valley -- Sebastiano Serlio and Philibert de l'Orme -- The Louvre and the Place Royale -- The Renaissance in England -- Elizabethan Country Houses -- Inigo Jones -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 12 Baroque Architecture -- The Reformation and Counter-Reformation -- Il Gesu, Rome -- Pope Sixtus V and the Replanning of Rome -- St. Peter's -- Gianlorenzo Bernini -- The Completion of St. Peter's -- S. Andrea al Quirinale, Rome -- Francesco Borromini -- S. Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome -- S. Ivo della Sapienza -- Urban Open Spaces in Baroque Rome -- The Piazza Navona -- The Piazza del Popolo and the Spanish Steps -- Essay: Piazza Navona -- A Space for Spectacle -- The Spread of Baroque Architecture to Northern Italy -- Guarino Guarini -- The Baroque in Central Europe -- Die Wies, Bavaria -- The Baroque in France -- The Louvre, Paris -- Francois Mansart -- The Chateau of Versailles -- Jules-Hardouin Mansart -- Christopher Wren and the Baroque in England -- The City Churches -- St. Paul's -- Housing in the Manner of Wren -- Nicholas Hawksmoor, Sir John Vanbrugh, and James Gibbs -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 13 Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, And The Rococo -- The Rococo -- The English Neo-Palladians -- Essay: The Enlightenment and the Abbe Laugier's Primitive Hut -- The Return to Antiquity -- The Style Created by Robert Adam -- William Chambers, an English Neo-Classicist Trained in France -- Architectural Education and Architectural Theory in France -- The Inventive Neo-Classicism of Etienne-Louis Boullee and Claude-Nicolas Ledoux -- Other Neo-Classical Architects in France -- The Distinctive Style of Sir John Soane in England -- The German Neo-Classicism of Karl Friedrich Schinkel -- Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, and Neo-Classicism in the United States -- Essay: Piranesi's View of Rome -- Romanticism and the Picturesque -- The Romantic Landscape -- Picturesque Buildings -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 14 Eclecticism, Industrialization, And Newness -- The Challenge of the Industrial Revolution -- Developments in Steel -- Iron and Glass Greenhouse Designs -- Joseph Paxton and the Crystal Palace -- Essay: The Coming of the Railroad -- Eugene-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc and Rational Design -- Henri Labrouste and His Library Designs -- Gustave Eiffel and His Tower -- Skeletal Construction in Concrete and Wood -- A.W.N.

Note continued: Samuel Mockbee and the Rural Studio -- A Regional Modernism in Japan -- Kenzo Tange -- Fumihiko Maki -- Arata Isozaki -- Tadao Ando -- Counterproposals to Modernism -- Robert Venturi -- Philip Johnson -- Charles Moore -- Michael Graves -- Modem Classicism and Ongoing Traditionalism -- Aldo Rossi -- Quinlan Terry -- Allan Greenberg -- Robert A.M. Stern -- Leon Krier -- Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk -- Deconstruction -- Modem Form-Makers -- Louis I. Kahn -- Jørn Utzon -- Ove Arup -- The Boston City Hall -- Justus Dahinden -- Frank Gehry -- Richard Meier -- Antoine Predock -- Rafael Moneo -- Rem Koolhaas and the Office for Metropolitan Architecture -- Zaha Hadid -- Maya Lin and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial -- Modern Materials and Technologies -- Eero Saarinen and His Office -- Carlo Scarpa -- James Stirling -- Norman Foster -- Renzo Piano -- Eric Owen Moss -- Tod Williams and Billie Tsien -- Mack Scogin and Merrill Elam -- Daniel Libeskind -- Steven Holl -- Jean Nouvel -- Santiago Calatrava -- Herzog and de Meuron -- Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio -- Sustainable Design -- R. Buckminster Fuller -- Glenn Murcutt -- Thom Mayne and Morphosis -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas

Pugin, the Gothic Revival, and Opposition to Industrialization -- John Ruskin and the Arts and Crafts Movement -- William Morris -- Richard Norman Shaw, C.F.A. Voysey, and Herman Muthesius -- The Art Nouveau -- Victor Horta and Hector Guimard -- Antonio Gaudi -- Charles Rennie Mackintosh -- The Viennese Secession -- The Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Richard Morris Hunt, and Frank Furness -- Henry Hobson Richardson and the Search for an American Style -- McKim, Mead, and White -- The First Skyscrapers -- Louis Sullivan and the Tall Building "Artistically Considered" -- The World's Columbian Exposition -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 15 The Twentieth Century And Modernism -- The Idea of a Modern Architecture -- The War of Words -- Adolf Loos -- Influence of Loos's Lectures and Publications -- The Raumplan and Loos's Buildings -- Frank Lloyd Wright -- Developing the Prairie House -- Wright's Early Public Buildings -- The Flight from America -- H.P. Berlage and Wendingen -- German Expressionism -- The Deutscher Werkbund and Peter Behrens -- Exploiting the Potential of Concrete -- Le Corbusier -- The Dom-ino and Citrohan Houses -- The Villa Stein and the Villa Savoye -- Le Corbusier's "Five Points" -- Essay: Futurism and Constructivism -- Walter Gropius -- The Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau -- De Stijl -- Ludwig Mies van der Rohe -- The Barcelona Pavilion and the Tugendhat House -- Mies, the Weissenhof Siedlung, and the International Style -- The Continuation of Traditional Design -- Art Deco or Style Moderne -- The Ongoing Modernist Program -- Later Work of Frank Lloyd Wright -- Broadacre City -- Fallingwater -- The Guggenheim Museum and Taliesin West -- Wrightian Connections -- Later Work of Le Corbusier -- Ronchamp and Ste. Marie-de-la-Tourette -- Chandigarh -- Diaspora and the Later Work of Mies Van der Rohe -- Planning and Building at IIT -- Conclusions About Architectural Ideas -- ch. 16 Modernisms In The Mid- And Late Twentieth Century And Beyond -- Modern Regionalism -- Alvar Aalto -- Luis Barragan -- Alvaro Siza

Updated with expanded coverage of twenty-first century architecture, this new edition uniquely comprises a detailed survey of Western architecture as well as architecture from the Middle East, Africa, Central and South America, India, Russia, China and Japan. Significant revision also includes photographs and textual discussion of around 50 new buildings. Written in a clear and engaging style, the text encourages readers to examine the pragmatic, innovative and aesthetic attributes of buildings. Artistic, economic, environmental, political, social and technological contexts are discussed. The global reach of the text is matched by a rich assortment of photographs from around the world and a greater array of detailed line drawings than in any architectural survey. The authors have created a formidable body of work that ranges over much of the world's architectural heritage and testifies to some of the greatest achievements of the human spirit

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